Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) For Children

Kids with disabilities who medically qualify as disabled through the Social Security Administration can get a monthly Supplemental Security Income, or SSI, disability payment. SSI is a need-based program available to families with low income and assets. Children cannot qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance benefits (SSDI, or SSD) because it’s available only to disabled people that have worked a particular amount of time in jobs that paid Social Security taxes. (But if a disabled kid’s parent is eligible for Social Security retirement or disability, the child may have the capacity to receive a dependent’s benefit called the “disabled adult child benefit” after turning 18.)

Your children might also qualify to get benefits on your own record when you qualify for Social Security disability benefits. Your eligible child can be your biological child, adopted child or stepchild. A dependent grandchild could also qualify.
The kid should be unmarried and be, to receive benefits:

  • under age 18; or
  • 18-19 years old and also a full-time student (no higher than grade 12); or
  • 18 or older and have a disability that started before age 22.

Typically, benefits stop when children reach age 18 unless they are disabled. However, if the child remains a full-time student at a secondary (or elementary) school at age 18, benefits will continue until the child graduates or until two months after the child becomes age 19, whichever is first.

What are Social Security Disability Benefits for Kids?

SSDI gives – or kids of workers – who have paid enough Social Security taxes to get handicap earnings they could use when they’re no longer able to work to monthly cash benefits to those workers.
Our adult children with disabilities or special health care demands can collect SSDI benefits in 2 ways. The first is if they’re approved for these benefits when your child gets benefits based on their very own employment record. The second is by collecting kid’s benefits, which is when an adult child gets benefits through their parent’s Social Security retirement and disability earnings. While both ways can give your child fiscal help, there are different rules for each.

There are there are only three different ways children can collect Social Security or SSI disability benefits. All of the benefits discussed here are cash benefits paid to the children of retired or disabled workers or to handicapped kids.

Low-income disabled children

Disabled youngsters whose families have low income can collect Supplemental Security Income (SSI) until they are 18, at which point they may be eligible to start collecting adult SSI benefits. Children who are approved for SSI disability may also receive Medicaid.

Kids who don’t qualify for SSI

Children who are younger than 18 (or 19 if a full-time student) and have a parent who is currently receiving Social Security Disability Income (SSDI) or Social Security retirement benefits (or who had earned enough Social Security credits to get one of these benefits before dying) may have the ability to collect dependents benefits predicated on their parents’ records, whether they’re handicapped or not.

Adults disabled since childhood

Handicapped kids who are older than 18 but who became disabled before they turn 22 can collect disability benefits if they have a parent collecting Social Security Disability Income (SSDI) or Social Security retirement income (or a deceased parent who was entitled to any of these benefits before their death).Formula for Calculating Amount of SSI Child Will Receive

Formula for Calculating Amount of SSI Child Will Receive

Social Security treats deemed income as unearned income to the kid during its calculations. Social Security has performed a separate income calculation for the little one to find out how much SSI is due to a kid with deemed income. If the child has no earned income of his/her own, Social Security just calculates the total amount of the kid’s SSI benefit by taking the parent’s deemed income, subtracting the $20 deduction, and then subtracting this amount from the current maximum monthly SSI sum ($735, in a state that really doesn’t supplement SSI). The balance is the amount of SSI each month the child will receive.

Social Security treats deemed income as unearned income to the kid during its calculations. Social Security has performed a separate income calculation for the little one to find out how much SSI is due to a kid with deemed income. If the child has no earned income of his/her own, Social Security just calculates the total amount of the kid’s SSI benefit by taking the parent’s deemed income, subtracting the $20 deduction, and then subtracting this amount from the current maximum monthly SSI sum ($735, in a state that really doesn’t supplement SSI). The balance is the amount of SSI each month the child will receive.

In the event the household receives child support on behalf of the disabled child, Social Security treats it as unearned income received by the youngster, but only counts two-thirds of the total monthly support as countable income. Also, Social Security just looks at child support that is certainly truly received, so in the event, the non-custodial parent does not pay support, it will not have any effect on the kid’s SSI benefit.

Changes in Living Circumstances

Deeming may be impacted when there is a change in status or family structure; hence, you need to keep the SSA updated if any one of these changes occurs in your family.
Parent stops receiving SSI

The parent’s income will probably be deemed to the child in the month he or she becomes ineligible for benefits if becomes ineligible for benefits.

Parent becomes eligible for SSI

When the parent becomes eligible for an SSI payment, deeming to the kid from the parent’s income ceases.

Departure of parent

Deeming from the dead parent’s income quits the month following the parent dies when a parent dies.

Kid moves into a treatment facility

Deeming is ceased, when a child moves into a medical treatment facility; moreover, the child may become ineligible for SSI.

Child turns 18

Deeming discontinues the month after the kid turns 18. After that, the kid’s own income is used to determine eligibility for SSI.

Parent and child discontinue living together

The parent’s income will no longer be deemed, commencing the month following their separation, if the parent and kid cease dwelling in exactly the same home.

Kid starts living with stepparent simply

If the biological or adoptive parent leaves the child living with a stepparent, deeming stops. The SSA will consider just the child’s own income to determine eligibility for SSI.